Las Vegas massacre reopen negotiations in Congress on tighter Gun Laws. Republicans offered up just


Sunday’s massacre in Las Vegas spurred a ritual-like response from U.S. politicians following the mass shootings that have left a trail of victims across the country: Democrats renewed demands for tougher gun laws while Republicans offered up prayers but showed no signs of supporting such legislation.

One day after the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history, which left at least 59 people dead and over 500 injured, House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan, a Republican, said in a statement on Monday: ”The whole country stands united in our shock, in our condolences and in our prayers.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, also a Republican, led his chamber in a moment of silence following the “devastating” massacre and urged “national mourning” and prayer.

Democrats were not falling in line.

Thoughts & prayers are NOT enough. Not when more moms & dads will bury kids this week, & more sons & daughters will grow up without parents,” Senator Elizabeth Warren said in a morning tweet.

Senator Chris Murphy, whose home state of Connecticut was the scene of a mass shooting in 2012 that killed 20 6-year-olds and six adults, was blunter.

It’s time for Congress to get off its ass and do something,” Murphy said in a statement.

Murphy also added that he would introduce a new background check bill and House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi also urged passage of legislation toughening checks on gun sales.

The Connecticut tragedy sparked serious negotiations in Congress on tighter gun laws, including tougher background checks for gun buyers. But the effort failed in 2013 amid strong opposition from gun groups such as the National Rifle Association.

Subsequent mass shootings have brought a similar call for Congress to act on tougher gun laws, only to see Republicans and some Democrats balk at what they see as infringements on the right to bear arms embedded in the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders, asked whether President Donald Trump might now favor tighter gun laws, told reporters: “I think that’s something that we can talk about in the coming days and see what that looks like moving forward.” She said the administration would not want laws created that would fail to “stop these types of things from happening.”

Nevada’s two U.S. senators, Republican Dean Heller and Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto, on Monday both issued statements offering prayers to victims and thanks to first responders, but neither mentioned anything about gun laws.

SENATE DEMOCRATS TAKE FLOOR ON GUNS... Read More

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